Month: July 2021

Chaucer’s Artistic Method in The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

Chaucer's Artistic Style in The Prlogue to The Canterbury

In this article, we will cover the questions about Chaucer’s artistic method in The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. We will also discuss the statement “Chaucer found his English a dialect and left it a langue.” Also, we will answer the question by illustrating that what are the salient features of Chaucer’s style. Introduction The …

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God’s Plenty in Chaucer’s Prologue to the Canterbury Tales

Good Friday, 1613 Riding Westward

This article will answer the questions about “Justification of the comment: “Here is God’s Plenty”. We will also discuss Chaucer’s Prologue to the Canterbury Tales as a portrait gallery. There is a statement that “Chaucer conceived and exhibited the ‘Human Comedy’”. This topic will also cover the explanation of this statement. Introduction The remark, “Here …

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The Knight & The Squire in The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales

English Poet Chaucer Life Biography Poetry Fictionistic

These notes can be considered as answers to the following two questions: “Compare and contrast the character of the Knight in The Prologue with that of the Squire.” and “Write a short note on the portraits of the Knight and the Squire in The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales”. The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales …

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At The Round Earth’s Imagin’d Corners – Poem Critical Analysis

At the round earths imagin’d corners by John Donne Fictionistic

Opening of Poem At the round earths imagin’d corners, blowYour trumpets, Angells, and arise, ariseFrom death, you nuberlesse infinitesOf soules, an to your scattred bodies goe,All whom the flood did, all fire shal o’erthrow,All whom warre, dearth, age, argues, tyrannies,Despaire, law chances hath slaine, and you whose eyes,Shall behold God, and never tast deaths woe.But …

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